Unaware that he is about to receive the “thank you” of a lifetime, the vet releases the chained horse.

We all want to live in a better world, but is there really a possibility for that if we don’t start treating animals with the respect they deserve? I really believe that taking care of those who are unable to speak for themselves is a prerequisite for achieving any level of excellence in living.

I have hope that humanity is still around, though, when I hear about people that go above and beyond for the welfare of all the creatures we coexist with on our earth.

Horses with the nickname “wild” are intended to be just that—wild and free. However, it happens frequently that these animals are shackled to prevent them from running away.

A member of the charity Four Paws named Ovidiu Rosu came upon a shackled horse in Romania and realized he needed to act quickly to free the lovely animal. This man, who also happened to be a vet, released the chains and was showered with the sweetest thanks ever.

The horse, not knowing what to expect, was noticeably anxious as Rosu approached it. Rosu managed to calm the animal down before he reached the chains, and then he was able to set it free. The horse’s legs showed signs of its agony in the form of markings.

After being set free, the wild horse patted Rosu’s nose as a token of appreciation for his kind deed. We are very grateful we got to see something so spectacular as this because the touching moment was captured on camera.

Sadly, Romanians frequently tether wild horses because they believe doing so will keep them from roaming freely in the protected Letea Forest.

These horses were left behind by the Tatars around 300 years ago, and as time went on, their population rose steadily.

“These horses were first brought to Romania by the Tatars between 300 and 400 years ago.” Many horses were left behind by the Tatars, who then let them loose throughout the neighborhood.

Following the dissolution of the local agricultural cooperatives in 1989, many horses were also released. Due to this, there was a significant increase in population; by 2010, the Danube Delta was home to up to 1,500 horses.

The Four Paws organization members offered to implement a program to administer contraceptives to horses in order to assist limit the population in order to put an end to this terrible practice of chaining horses. This reduced the number of horses, but the people still insist on chaining them, a habit that animal rights activists frequently end.

In addition to everything else, Four Paws provides immunizations for wild horses.

Please share this heartwarming story to raise awareness of the fantastic work that this animal group conducts.